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VIDEO: NRA's LaPierre Says No To Ban On Large Capacity Magazines

The National Rifle Association's Wayne LaPierre.
Molly Riley
/
UPI /Landov
The National Rifle Association's Wayne LaPierre.

One of the sharpest exchanges during his more than 20-minute long appearance Sunday on NBC's Meet the Press came when National Rifle Association CEO and Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre was asked why it wouldn't make sense to ban high capacity magazines for guns such as the one used to kill 20 school children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.

Essentially, he said that gunman Adam Lanza would have found some other way to try to kill so many people. We've created a clip that focuses just on that exchange with host David Gregory.

Friday, LaPierre made the case that armed police officers need to be on duty in all schools. "The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun," he said.

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Mark Memmott is NPR's supervising senior editor for Standards & Practices. In that role, he's a resource for NPR's journalists – helping them raise the right questions as they do their work and uphold the organization's standards.
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