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No Decisions Yet On The Most-Anticipated Supreme Court Cases

An artist's sketch of the scene during a U.S. Supreme Court hearing earlier this year.
Art Lien
/
Reuters / Landov
An artist's sketch of the scene during a U.S. Supreme Court hearing earlier this year.

There's no big news again today from the U.S. Supreme Court — which is sort-of big news in itself because it means we're still waiting for the justices' decisions on these major cases:

-- Fisher v. University of Texas, a key test of affirmative action in higher education.

-- Shelby County v. Holder, in which the issue is whether times have changed and the 1965 Voting Rights Act should no longer apply to that Alabama county.

-- Hollingsworth v. Perry and United States v. Windsor, two potentially landmark cases on gay marriage.

Those cases were not among the three decisions handed down by the court Monday. The next day on which decisions are due to be announced is Thursday.

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