Krishnadev Calamur | KUNC

Krishnadev Calamur

Krishnadev Calamur is NPR's deputy Washington editor. In this role, he helps oversee planning of the Washington desk's news coverage. He also edits NPR's Supreme Court coverage. Previously, Calamur was an editor and staff writer at The Atlantic. This is his second stint at NPR, having previously worked on NPR's website from 2008-15. Calamur received an M.A. in journalism from the University of Missouri.

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

The shootout involving motorcycle gangs last weekend in Waco, Texas, resulted in 170 arrests and put a spotlight on the gangs' history, which dates back to the 1940s.

We've been telling you about the opposition from some writers to the decision by the PEN American Center to give Charlie Hebdo its Freedom of Expression Courage Award. The satirical French publication was targeted by Islamist militants Jan. 7 apparently for its cartoons of Islam's Prophet Muhammad. The attack killed 12 people.

Six writers have withdrawn from the PEN American Center's annual gala on May 5 in protest against the free-speech organization's decision to give the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo its annual Freedom of Expression Courage Award.

The World War II-era Japanese battleship Musashi was sunk by U.S. warplanes on Oct. 24, 1944, during the Battle of Leyte Gulf, one of the war's largest naval battles. Despite numerous eyewitness accounts at the time, the location of the wreckage was never known. Until now.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said today his country has a "profound disagreement" with the White House on Iran and he is "determined to speak before Congress" on March 3 on the Islamic republic's nuclear program.

"I am going to the United States not because I seek a confrontation with the president, but because I must [fulfill] my obligation to speak up on a matter that affects the very survival of my country," Netanyahu said in a statement.

New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton confirmed there had been a work slowdown by officers in the weeks since two police officers were shot dead, but added that the matter was being corrected.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., says he could decide to run for president even if former Florida GOP Gov. Jeb Bush announces a presidential run.

"We certainly know a lot of the same people, we also know some different people," Rubio told NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview that airs New Year's Day. "I don't believe if I decide to run for president that that will be an impediment."

Fans of Ayn Rand rejoice. The New American Library announced today that Rand's novel Ideal is finally being published in the form in which she intended it.

Rand, who died in 1982, wrote Ideal as a novel in 1934. But she didn't like it and set it aside. Later that year, she reworked it as a play, which The Wall Street Journal notes had its New York premiere in 2010.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

For more than six decades, the heart of a Beat literature classic had been thought lost, dropped overboard a houseboat. Turns out, the letter that helped inspire Jack Kerouac's On the Road has now reportedly resurfaced — not from the sea, but from an unopened envelope buried in a defunct publisher's office.

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