Science

Mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood use a variety of clues to track down humans, including our body heat and the carbon dioxide in our breath. Now, research shows that a certain olfactory receptor in their antennae also serves as a detector of humans, responding to smelly chemicals in our sweat.

When you're thirsty, a swig of fresh water brings instant relief. But gulp down some salty sea water and you'll still feel parched.

That's because your brain is trying to keep the concentration of salt in your body within a very narrow range, says Zachary Knight, an associate professor in physiology at the University of California, San Francisco and an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Daniel Max / Flickr

The expectation of receiving pain can lead to feeling pain, according to a new brain imaging study from the University of Colorado Boulder.

If you own mineral rights to a piece of private property and an important dinosaur fossil is discovered there, do you own the fossil? A federal district court just ruled you do. 

Stacy Nick / KUNC

There's a common stereotype that scientists aren't funny -- they're smart, anti-social, maybe a little odd, but definitely not funny.

"I'm a professor, I've seen the glaze many times and people falling asleep," said Fleur Ferro, who teaches biology at the Community College of Denver.

But it doesn't have to be that way, Ferro said.

Florida this week declared a state of emergency because of a slow-moving natural disaster — red tide.

Red tide is toxic algae that have persisted off Florida's Gulf Coast for nearly a year. In recent weeks, the algae bloom has worsened, killing fish, turtles and dolphins and discouraging tourism on some of the state's most beautiful beaches.

Frank Flocke

A diverse team of scientists led by Colorado State University will be on an aircraft conducting smoke observation flights in Boise, Idaho.

Simulating The Weather Created By Fire In New Study

Jul 30, 2018

A recent study is helping researchers understand the role of wind in the largest forest fires.

Sean Coburn / University of Colorado

Wyoming and Colorado are in the top ten natural gas producing states. But in those states – and across the country – a lot of that gas is escaping straight into the air. Scientists are now working to come up with a better way to track those leaks down.

Courtesy of NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Bet you never thought about Mozart and methane going together, did you? One music festival is doing just that: combining classical music and climate science.

It might seem a little strange to some, but that’s kind of the idea, said Jephta Bernstein, executive artistic director for Off the Hook Arts. The Fort Collins music education program is using the theme Mission Earth for its SummerFest 2018 series.

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