Health

1:20am

Tue July 2, 2013
Shots - Health News

Myths And Stigma Stoke TB Epidemic In Tajikistan

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:51 am

Nurse Tina Martin checks on Orion Qurbonaliev, 4, who has tuberculosis. Orion's grandmother, Kholbibi Abdulloeva, also has TB.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Four-year-old Orion Qurbonaliev is lucky to be alive. Just last February, the little boy was lying comatose in the tuberculosis ward of a hospital in southern Tajikistan. The bacteria had spread to his spine and paralyzed the right side of his body. He was severely dehydrated and malnourished.

The staff on the government-run ward had run out of options for treating Orion. "They just left this kid to die," says Tina Martin, a nurse with Doctors Without Borders.

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2:47pm

Mon July 1, 2013
Shots - Health News

Guidelines Aim To Clear Confusion Over Ear Tubes For Kids

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:28 am

You can probably chuck those ear plugs and enjoy the pool.
iStockphoto.com

Doctors have been putting in a lot of ear tubes. It's the most common outpatient surgery in children.

Despite how common the tubes are, it's been hard for parents to know if and when a child should get them. "Pediatricians are confused about it too," says Dr. Richard Rosenfeld, chairman of otolaryngology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. "And ENT doctors."

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12:48pm

Mon July 1, 2013
The Salt

Experimental Treatment For Milk Allergy May Not Last

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 3:22 pm

Researchers are learning more about how to treat milk allergy by giving kids a small amount of milk protein, but it needs further study.
MICHAEL PROBST ASSOCIATED PRESS

One out of every 13 children has a food allergy, but the affliction still regularly stumps doctors. As Kari Nadeau, director of the Stanford Alliance for Food Allergy Research, told Terry Gross in April on Fresh Air, researchers still don't understand what "flips the switch between a food allergen versus a food nutrient in children."

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11:25am

Mon July 1, 2013
Shots - Health News

HIV Treatment Should Start Even Earlier, WHO Says

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 1:10 pm

Women in Bangalore, India, make red ribbons at an HIV support center in November 2012.
Manjunath Kiran AFP/Getty Images

Getting people on HIV drugs even before they get sick helps them live longer and slows the spread of virus, the World Health Organization said Sunday.

The number of new HIV infections has dropped by 20 percent worldwide since the push to expand HIV treatment worldwide began in 2002. The medications prevented about 4 million deaths from AIDS-related problems in developing countries, the WHO report says.

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1:04am

Mon July 1, 2013
Shots - Health News

You Ask, We Answer: Demystifying The Affordable Care Act

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:25 am

Families soon will be able to sign up for new health insurance options through the Affordable Care Act. In Washington, D.C., Dr. Cheryl Focht of Mary's Center performs a checkup of Jayson Gonzalez, 16, while his mother, Elizabeth Lopez, looks on.
Heather Rousseau NPR

The biggest changes in health insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act are set to begin less than three months from now. Oct. 1 is when people can start signing up for coverage in new state health exchanges. The policies would kick in on Jan. 1, 2014.

It can all be a little confusing, we agree. So two weeks ago, we asked what you wanted to know about the health law.

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