Health

8:08am

Tue March 5, 2013
Shots - Health News

Often A Health Care Laggard, U.S. Shines In Cancer Treatment

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 5:04 am

The U.S. ranks first in the world at stopping brain cancers, epidemiologists reported Monday. Here neurosurgeon Dr. Roger Hudgins and his assistant, Holly Zeller of Akron, Ohio, look at an MRI scan before performing surgery to remove a brain tumor.
Mike Cardew MCT /Landov

When it comes to the state of the nation's health, the U.S. seems to get one poor grade after another. Despite spending more on health care, we've been slipping behind other high-income countries for life expectancy and healthy living.

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3:15pm

Mon March 4, 2013
Shots - Health News

Got A Health Care Puzzle? There Should Be An App!

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 3:41 pm

The GetHealth app was a runner-up at the recent Hackovate Health Innovation Competition held in Kansas City, Mo.
Courtesy of GetHealth Limited

Kansas City, Mo., is looking to boost its health-tech cred.

So the city that's home to Cerner Corp. and other health information firms seemed a natural to host something called the Hackovate Health Innovation Competition.

A mashup of innovation and old-school hacking (though none of the participants was bent on doing harm, we're assured), the goal of the competition was to improve the nation's health system and help people navigate the complexities of the Affordable Care Act.

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1:22pm

Mon March 4, 2013
Shots - Health News

Best Defense Against Fire Ants May Be Allergy Shot Offense

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 4:55 am

The sting of Solenopsis invicta, the red imported fire ant, is well known to many in the Southern United States, but immunotherapy is possible.
Courtesy of Alex Wild

"Life-threatening fire ant attack" may sound like a B-movie script, but for people living in the Southern third of the United States, it's no joke.

These ant stings can cause deadly allergic reactions, but most people aren't getting the allergy shots that could save their lives, a new study says.

Fire ants sting people, just like bees do, and 2 to 3 percent of people are allergic to the ant's venom. But where bee stings are rare, fire ant stings are incredibly common for people who live in Texas and other Southern states.

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9:19am

Mon March 4, 2013
Shots - Health News

Mouse Study Sheds Light On Why Some Cancer Vaccines Fail

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 12:31 pm

A simple switch of ingredients made a big difference in how mice responded to experimental cancer vaccines.
Andrei Tchernov iStockphoto.com

In the quest for better cancer medicines, vaccines that treat rather than prevent disease are getting lots of attention.

More than 90 clinical trials have tested therapeutic vaccines in cancer patients, but the results have been a mixed bag.

A recent study in mice suggests that changing a traditional ingredient in the vaccines could make a big difference.

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1:24am

Mon March 4, 2013
Shots - Health News

Your Child's Fat, Mine's Fine: Rose-Colored Glasses And The Obesity Epidemic

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:30 pm

Adam Cole NPR

About 69 percent of American adults are overweight or obese, and more than four in five people say they are worried about obesity as a public health problem.

But a recent poll conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health revealed a curious schism in our national attitudes toward obesity: Only one in five kids had a parent who feared the boy or girl would grow up to be overweight as an adult.

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