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Zimmerman Released After Posting Bail, Will Go Into Hiding But Be Monitored

George Zimmerman, left, as he walked out of jail earlier today. The other man was not identified.
Brian Blanco
/
AP
George Zimmerman, left, as he walked out of jail earlier today. The other man was not identified.

Just after midnight earlier today, George Zimmerman — the man at the center of a killing that has become a national story because of its racial overtones — was released from the Sanford, Fla., jail where he was being held while awaiting trial.

He posted the required 10 percent ($15,000) of his $150,000 bail and left wearing an electronic monitoring device that will allow authorities to track his movements.

According to theOrlando Sentinel:

"It's likely that Zimmerman will leave the state, but officials will be able to monitor his actions no matter where he is living while he awaits trial. Zimmerman had gone into hiding in an unknown location outside of Florida before he was arrested earlier this month.

"Zimmeran's address will be kept private for safety reasons. His life has been threatened numerous times."

Zimmerman, 28, is the man who shot and killed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin on Feb. 26 in Sanford. The killing ignited protests in cities across the country and renewed the national discussion about race relations because Martin's family and supporters believe the teen was "profiled" by Zimmerman. They also believe local authorities did not initially arrest Zimmerman because they were too quick to believe his claim of self defense.

Martin was African-American. Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, had called police to say a "suspicious" youth was in his neighborhood. He has been charged with second-degree murder. Zimmerman has said he acted in self defense after Martin attacked him. Martin's family and supporters say it appears Zimmerman stalked the teenager.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Mark Memmott is NPR's supervising senior editor for Standards & Practices. In that role, he's a resource for NPR's journalists – helping them raise the right questions as they do their work and uphold the organization's standards.
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