Elise Hu

Evacuee Roxanne Peters had planned to prepare food tomorrow, for Thanksgiving dinner.

"I was celebrating at two different houses. We were invited to two different places, and I was cooking, you know, potluck," she said.

Both those homes burned to the ground in the historic Camp Fire. The scale of the fire's destruction is so spread out that very little of the towns of Paradise, Magalia and Concow remain. So far, the fire scorched 230 square miles — an area the size of Chicago.

"I'll be giving thanks this year that we made it out alive," Peters says.

Fleeing war, more than 500 Yemenis arrived earlier this year in an unlikely place — a tiny South Korean resort island. They're hoping to be granted asylum so they can stay in South Korea, but as they wait on the island of Jeju, they've become the target of blistering backlash from South Koreans.

"I love Korea, really," Ebrahim Qaid says. He is one of 561 Yemenis who arrived on Jeju earlier this year through the island's policy of allowing most foreign nationals to enter without getting a visa in advance.

President Trump will meet North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un next week in Singapore, in an effort to resolve the nuclear threat posed by Pyongyang. But in the lead-up to that summit, the threat the totalitarian regime poses to its 25 million people has not been addressed. It didn't come up either at the inter-Korean summits or during President Trump's White House meeting last week with Kim's lieutenant, Kim Yong Chol.

Around the world, the flurry of diplomatic efforts to salvage the June 12 summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has dominated headlines. But there's one place where it hasn't: North Korea itself.

A North Korean envoy, Kim Yong Chol, met this week with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in New York, but North Koreans are seeing none of that in their regular 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. national broadcasts.

A topsy-turvy week on the Korean peninsula ended with a secret Saturday summit between the rival Korean leaders, in which North Korea's Kim Jong Un again made a commitment to denuclearization. That's according to his South Korean negotiating partner, President Moon Jae-in, who met on Kim's request. The two reaffirmed previous commitments to inter-Korean cooperation and worked to keep momentum driving toward a U.S.-North Korea summit.

South Korea's President Moon Jae-in is in Washington to meet with President Trump, as plans for a high-stakes summit next month between the U.S. president and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un hit some turbulence.

With North Korea's threats to back away from the talks, South Korea's leader — who has long favored engagement rather than confrontation with Pyongyang — is having to do some diplomacy to keep both the U.S. and North Korea interested in talking.

Updated at 5:05 a.m. ET

Following a historic meeting between North Korea's Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, the leaders appeared side by side to make an extraordinary announcement: The two nations — technically in a state of war for more than six decades — would work toward a permanent peace treaty and the elimination of nuclear weapons from the peninsula.

South Koreans have painstakingly planned out the details ahead of North Korea's Kim Jong Un and South Korea's Moon Jae-in's summit at their shared border Friday, the culmination of a flurry of diplomacy over the past few months.

Confronting the North Korea threat takes partners, and Japan is among America's most reliable allies in Asia. But lately, Japan is feeling increasingly left out.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is trying to do something about it, meeting with President Trump in person on Tuesday in Mar-a-Lago, Fla. It's happening just as Abe faces roiling political problems at home.

A court in Seoul has found former South Korean President Park Geun-hye guilty on a raft of charges in the sprawling corruption case that led to her impeachment.

She has been sentenced to 24 years in prison — effectively a life sentence for the 66-year-old. Park was also fined nearly $17 million.

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