Stephanie Paige Ogburn

Bente Birkeland / RMCR

As Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper weighs whether to call a special legislative session to deal with oil and gas issues, the issue of property rights is on his mind.

The governor has equated some of the recently passed bans and moratoriums on hydraulic fracturing to "…snatching the property of a citizen. Just taking it without due compensation."

While in some cases the courts could interpret fracking bans as taking away private property, getting to the point where a ban is ruled a taking of private property would be time consuming and costly, experts say.

Stephanie Paige Ogburn / KUNC

If you feel like you’ve dodged more than your share of hail and giant, plunking raindrops over the past few weeks, you probably have.

Creative Commons

The United States has finally regained the jobs it lost in the 2007 recession, according to numbers out from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Colorado’s recovery has been a little quicker; economists say the state regained its lost jobs by December 2013 – seven months ahead of the nation. But the comeback doesn’t mean all areas of the state are recovering evenly, or that those who lost their jobs have them back.

Jim Hill / KUNC

After a rare magnitude 3.2 earthquake northeast of Greeley, scientists hope to learn more about any possible future quakes in the area. They’ve quickly mobilized to set up a network of five instruments that monitor for earthquakes, all around the epicenter of the original one.

Colorado Geological Survey

After a 3.2 magnitude earthquake hit Saturday evening near the northeastern Colorado town of Greeley, questions about its connection to oil and gas development started popping up on social media and in the blogosphere, with anti-fracking activists trying to make a link between the two.

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