Colorado Oil and Gas Association (COGA)

Matt Bloom / KUNC

The Senate passed sweeping oil and gas legislation on Wednesday, confirming several House amendments requested by industry representatives concerned about its economic impacts. The bill now heads to Gov. Polis’ desk, where he’s expected to sign it.

Oil and gas
Matt Bloom / KUNC

The Colorado House passed a major overhaul of oil and gas regulations in a final hearing Friday morning, sending the legislation back to the full Senate one last time to approve amendments.

Lawmakers voted 36-28 to approve Senate Bill 19-181. One House member was absent.

Photo by Kirk Siegler

OPEC and other foreign oil producers said Friday they’re scaling back production by about 1.2 million barrels a day. That could be good news for oil producers in the Mountain West but perhaps not so good for consumers.

Photo by Kirk Siegler

Initiative 97, a ballot question that would increase Colorado’s minimum oil and gas well setbacks, has qualified for the upcoming midterm election.

The Colorado Secretary of State’s office announced on Aug. 29 it had verified enough signatures supporting the effort.

Jim Hill/KUNC

Fort Collins is close to increasing the minimum distance it requires between new developments and oil and gas wells within its borders.

The city council voted on Aug. 21 to change minimum setbacks from homes from 350 feet to 500 feet. It also created a new 1,000-foot buffer for more populated buildings like schools, hospitals, nursing homes and daycare centers.

Clinton Steeds / Flickr

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper signed an executive order this week requiring that abandoned oil and gas equipment be plugged up or removed. 

The move comes about a year after an old natural gas pipeline leaked methane into a home in Firestone, Colorado. The home exploded, killing two people and injuring another.

Photo by Kirk Siegler

An oil and gas advocacy group is warning Colorado taxpayers they could face billions of dollars in compensation claims if voters approve tough new restrictions on where wells can be drilled.

Leigh Paterson

Across the county, in areas like north Texas, western Pennsylvania and in the suburbs and towns north of Denver, communities are becoming industrialized, dotted with oil and gas wells, laced with pipelines. People in these communities are living with the potential risks that comes from living close to oil and gas development.

Leigh Paterson / Insider Energy

In Northern Colorado, two massive industries are colliding: home development and energy development. At the intersection of the two are serious and growing concerns about health and safety.

As more drilling rigs and more subdivisions go up in towns across the Front Range, what happens when people and oil and gas become neighbors?

Inside Energy

A home explosion in a Denver suburb in April that has been linked to energy development has left Colorado communities wondering: are we safe? To give some context to that question, Inside Energy and Rocky Mountain PBS has analyzed data relating to spills, fires, explosions, and the inspectors charged with keeping an eye on it all.

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