Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

The City of Evans / Flickr - used with permission

When floodwaters inundated parts of the City of Evans Sept. 13, 2013, homes were damaged or destroyed, roads were made impassable and the city’s main wastewater treatment plant was heavily damaged. 11 months on, the city has greatly recovered, but there’s still work to do.

The House is expected to vote as early as next week to partially repeal a 2012 law that overhauled the National Flood Insurance Program, which is tens of billions of dollars in debt.

The law was meant to make people living in flood-prone areas foot more of the insurance bill. But lawmakers didn't realize how many homeowners would be affected — or how hard they'd be hit.

You can find some of those homeowners in Bayou Gauche, about 30 miles west of New Orleans.

Nathan Heffel / KUNC

On the heels of a plea to the Federal Emergency Management Agency by the city of Evans for funds to clean up two flood damaged mobile home parks; a statement from the agency outlines millions of dollars in past assistance to the city, but does not pledge additional funds.

Weld County

There are 208 private mobile homes in Evans seemingly frozen in time. Ravaged by the September flood and now abandoned, the city was counting on Federal Emergency Management Agency money for clean up. The agency turned down that request in a letter sent in November.

Grace Hood / KUNC

Larimer County officials have repaired 45 bridges and reopened 30 miles of temporary roadway following September’s flooding. But there’s a growing concern about fixing some private roads damaged by floodwaters.

Kevin Beaty / Flickr - Creative Commons

The task of rebuilding following September’s historic flooding will take years to complete and one man - Jerre Stead, Colorado’s Chief Recovery Officer -  is overseeing the effort.

Nurpu / Creative Commons/Flickr

It’s been nearly six weeks since massive floods hit Colorado’s Front Range. Although cleanup and recovery is now well underway, emergency management officials say there’s still work to do.

In flood-ravaged Colorado, much of the recovery has focused on rebuilding roads and bridges to mountain towns cut off by last month's floods. But take a drive east to the state's rolling plains, and a whole new set of staggering problems unfolds in farm country.

Living In Limbo

A woman named Claudia, who doesn't want to use her last name because of her immigration status, is sitting on a couch in the lobby of a shabby hotel in Greeley, about an hour's drive northeast of Denver.

U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Wallace Bonner/Released

The Federal Emergency Management Agency says flood survivors in the nine designated counties hit by Colorado’s historic floods have until Nov. 14 to apply for assistance from the agency.

Grace Hood / KUNC

Vice President Joe Biden traveled to Colorado Monday to see the devastation from flooding that has damaged or destroyed thousands of homes and left 8 dead.

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