Agriculture

1:27am

Thu August 16, 2012
Africa

In South Sudan, Cows Are Cash And Source Of Friction

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 2:53 pm

A man from the Mundari nomad tribe stands among cattle on Jan. 18, in Juba, South Sudan. Cattle raids, a common occurrence in the region, have grown increasingly violent in recent years.
Kyodo/Landov

For the rural people of South Sudan, cattle are at the center of their culture. They use them as currency, treat them as objects of beauty, and fight tribal battles over them.

In recent years, traditional cattle raids have turned deadly. Tribesmen aren't just stealing cattle; they are slaughtering rivals, burning villages and abducting women and children.

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1:47pm

Tue August 14, 2012
The Salt

Secret Side Of The Drought: Many Corn Farmers Will Benefit

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 9:28 am

President Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack (second from right) inspect drought-damaged corn on the McIntosh farm in Missouri Valley, Iowa.
Carolyn Kaster AP

You've all heard a lot about this year's devastating drought in the Midwest, right? The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced last Friday that the average U.S. cornfield this year will yield less per acre than it has since 1995. Soybean yields are down, too.

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1:17pm

Mon August 13, 2012
The Two-Way

Hog Prices Rise On Word That Feds Will Buy Pork In Bid To Help Farmers

Hogs at a farm in Elma, Iowa (2009 file photo).
Scott Olson Getty Images

President Obama not coincidentally chose Iowa today as the backdrop for his announcement that the federal government is buying $170 million worth of pork, chicken, lamb and catfish to help producers who've been hit hard by drought-related increases in feed costs and by soft prices because of overproduction.

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8:01am

Sun August 12, 2012
Around the Nation

Maine Lobstermen Give Farming Sea Scallops A Try

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 11:57 am

As lobster prices plunge, scallops offer fishermen an alternative to make money.
Levi Bridges for NPR

If you don't love scallops, you probably just haven't had one that's cooked properly. That is, pan fried with some garlic and butter and herbs. They are very tasty.

In Maine, scientists and fishermen are learning how to farm, instead of catching, these tasty sea critters. That could be good for business and the environment.

Out on the water off Stonington, Maine, Marsden Brewer is motoring his lobster boat through the crowded fishing harbor. Today, just about all the boats here are lobster boats. But 30 years ago, he says, it was a different story.

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2:44am

Sat August 11, 2012
Around the Nation

Some Idaho Farmers Pray, Others Turn On The Water

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 12:38 pm

Farmer Hans Hayden walks through his drought-stricken wheat field in Idaho. He says the wheat should be 3 feet tall by now.
Molly Messick for NPR

In the West, in Idaho's arid, high desert, the drought has a mixed effect. There's a big divide between farmers with deep wells and irrigation and those without.

Hans Hayden is a rare find: a talkative farmer. He likes to explain things. But when it comes to the wheat he planted this spring, there's not much to say. This field needed rain. It didn't get it.

"At this point in time, it kind of looks like a desert," he says.

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