Civil Rights

4:05pm

Mon July 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Feds Unlikely To Prosecute Zimmerman, Former Prosecutors Say

In Los Angeles on Sunday, demonstrators expressed their anger over the acquittal of George Zimmerman on the charges he faced for the death of Trayvon Martin.
Jim Ruymen UPI /Landov
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4:25pm

Sun July 14, 2013
U.S.

National Reaction To The Zimmerman Verdict: 'What Next?'

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 1:55 pm

A woman, who refused to be identified, carries a young boy on her shoulders as she participates in a rally Sunday in Baltimore protesting the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the Florida shooting death of teenager Trayvon Martin.
Patrick Semansky AP

The acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin is reverberating far beyond Florida. On Sunday, President Obama acknowledged the strong passions the verdict has incited. He asked Americans "to respect the call for calm reflection from two parents who lost their young son."

Many people are trying to make sense of a case that sparked a national conversation on race and gun laws.

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2:49pm

Sun July 14, 2013
News

The Civil Rights Stand Of A Young Gerald Ford

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 4:54 pm

President Gerald Ford finishes giving a speech on Jan. 13, 1975. Ford was born 100 years ago Sunday.
Marion S. Trikosko Courtesy of Library of Congress

President Gerald R. Ford, the only American to serve as both vice president and president without ever being elected to either office, was born 100 years ago Sunday.

Ford will be remembered for his role in the turbulent post-Watergate era. But a little-known story from his college days might also serve to define Ford's character.

The Gerald Ford We Know

In 1973, Ford was a congressman from Grand Rapids, Mich., who had risen through the ranks to become House minority leader. In those days before C-SPAN, Ford was barely known to most Americans.

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2:49pm

Sun July 14, 2013
Law

Pennsylvania's Voter ID Law Gets Its Day In Court

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 9:13 pm

The Penndot Drivers License Center in Butler, Pa., displays signs promoting the requirement for voters to show an acceptable photo ID at the polls. On Monday, a judge will rule on the constitutionality of the state's controversial voter ID law.
Keith Srakocic AP

Pennsylvania's voter ID law will be back in state court Monday after more than a year of legal limbo. A state judge will decide whether the 2012 law — which hasn't been enforced — violates the state's constitution.

The measure requires voters to show a particular state-issued photo ID before casting ballots. Last week, civil rights advocates like the NAACP's John Jordan railed against the requirement.

"It's a ploy to take votes away from people who deserve them — veterans, seniors, students, people with disabilities, people of color and hard-working folk," Jordan said.

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10:11am

Sun July 14, 2013
The Two-Way

Civil Rights Groups Call Zimmerman Verdict A 'Miscarriage'

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 1:48 pm

Supporters of Treyvon Martin wait in front of the Seminole County Criminal Justice Center before the not-guilty verdict was announced in the George Zimmerman murder trial on Saturday in Sanford, Fla. Now, the NAACP and other groups are calling for the Department of Justice to bring a civil rights case against George Zimmerman.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Civil rights groups reacted with disappointment to the not-guilty verdict in the George Zimmerman murder trial.

After the outcome became known late Saturday, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund said it would push for the Department of Justice to bring civil rights charges against Zimmerman, who was accused in the fatal shooting of 17-year-old black youth Trayvon Martin.

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