Climate Change

2:47pm

Wed August 27, 2014
Science

There's A Big Leak In America's Water Tower

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Joe Giersch, an ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, studies stoneflies that live only in the melt from glaciers and snowpack in the northern Rockies.
Clint Muhlfeld USGS

The northern arm of the Rocky Mountains is sometimes called "the crown of the continent," and its jewels are glaciers and snowfields that irrigate large parts of North America during spring thaw.

But the region is getting warmer, even faster than the rest of the world. Scientists now say warming is scrambling the complex relationship between water and nature and could threaten some species with extinction as well as bring hardship to ranchers and farmers already suffering from prolonged drought.

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3:02am

Wed August 27, 2014
Business

Driven By Climate Change, Cotton Buyers Look For Alternatives

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 9:32 pm

Unifi makes Repreve, a thread that comes from plastic waste bottles and leftover polyester scraps, at its Yadkinville, N.C., facility.
Courtesy of Unifi

VF Corp. is one of the biggest clothing companies you might not have heard of. But its brands include Lee and Wrangler jeans, Timberland shoes and The North Face, and it also makes uniforms for police and major league sports teams.

It's also a large purchaser of cotton. "We buy roughly 1 percent of the cotton available in the world," says Letitia Webster, VF's senior director of sustainability. Her job is to both reduce the company's greenhouse gas footprint and reduce its risks from climate change.

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6:04pm

Sat August 23, 2014
Climate

Stark Data And A Remedy For Denver's Urban Heat

Concrete from streets and buildings create higher heat levels downtown.
Credit National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration / Wikimedia Commons

It’s common knowledge that city dwellers experience higher temperatures than their neighboring rural counterparts. Climate change exacerbates the situation. For residents in the Denver Metro area, temperatures are rising faster than most cities.

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5:00am

Tue August 19, 2014
Climate Change

What 13,000 Dead Grasshoppers Can Tell Us About Climate Change

Cesar Nufio shows red mites on a grasshopper found at one of his research sites. Nufio has surveyed and collected grasshoppers at these sites for nine years, replicating the work of Gordon Alexander.
Stephanie Paige Ogburn KUNC

Cesar Nufio is holding a box of dead grasshoppers. The insects, precisely pinned, with miniscule labels affixed beneath them, march down the box in neat, dark lines.

The grasshoppers are just a sampling of a 50-year-old set of 13,000 grasshoppers that Nufio, an entomologist at the University of Colorado, is using to learn about climate change. Until the scientist happened upon them about a decade ago, this collection was nearly forgotten – stored in 250 wooden boxes atop a shelf. Ever since finding the collection, Nufio has been piecing together the story of the lost grasshoppers, and is using them to understand how the change in the area's climate is affecting the insects.

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3:20pm

Tue August 12, 2014
The Salt

Iowa's Corn Farmers Learn To Adapt To Weather Extremes

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 9:32 am

Farmer Seth Watkins (left) and agronomist Matt Liebman stand amid native prairie grasses near Des Moines, Iowa. The conservation strip is used to stop soil erosion.
John Ydstie NPR

Climate change is creating all kinds of challenges and opportunities for business. One of the sectors that feels the effects most immediately is agriculture. Already, weather patterns are making it more challenging to raise corn β€” even in Iowa β€” in the middle of the Corn Belt.

Seth Watkins raises corn and cattle in southern Iowa, and he recalls the memorable weather from 2012.

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