Environment

8:00am

Sun April 13, 2014

3:20pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Water

Water Board Sets Allotment For Northern Colorado Farmers, Cities

A power plant within Big Thompson Canyon, a crucial water way for the Colorado-Big Thompson project which pulls water from Western Slope streams to Front Range cities and farms.
Credit U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

Northern Colorado farmers and municipalities will see a bump from last fall in how much supplemental water they receive from the Colorado-Big Thompson Project, which pulls Western Slope water to the Front Range.

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5:00am

Thu April 10, 2014
Transportation

1 Month Before MAX Launch, No Detail Is Too Small

Workers survey the South Transit Center, the south-most point along the MAX route.
Grace Hood KUNC

After two years of construction and numerous traffic detours, the first bus rapid transit system along the Front Range is about to debut in Fort Collins. The new $87-million dollar Mason Express, or MAX, route is being hailed as a key transportation alternative as the city continues to grow.

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6:00am

Wed April 9, 2014
Agriculture

Vertical Farming: Towering Vision, Uncertain Future

Large banks of fluorescent lamps provide the spectrum of light that keeps the floating beds of plants alive year-round in The Plant Chicago, a vertical farming facility.
Peter Gray Harvest Public Media

Farmers are making inroads supplying local food to hungry city foodies, but many producers are trying to grow more food in urban centers. City real estate is at a premium, so some producers are finding more space by using what’s called “vertical farming,” and going up rather than spreading out.

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3:00pm

Fri April 4, 2014
Environment

Waters Will Flood Part Of Colorado River, For Just A Few Weeks

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 6:03 pm

Thanks to an agreement between the U.S. and Mexico, water is flowing to 35 million people in both countries along the Colorado River Delta. At least for now.
Ted Robbins/NPR

Millions of gallons of water used to flow every day from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of California. Now, the Colorado River ends at Morelos Dam on the U.S.-Mexico border. Below it, one of North America's largest wetlands is dry.

Karl Flessa, a geoscientist at the University of Arizona, began researching the damage two decades ago. Then he started asking how much water it would take to bring back some of the habitats.

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