Denver

Courtesy of Cheyenne Michaels

Katy Williams is used to having to explain her work.

“I’ll tell people I’m a puppeteer and they’re like, ‘Oh, so like The Muppets?’” Williams said. “And I’m like, ‘Yes -- but no.’”

Because what Williams does is so much more than felted fabric.

Courtesy of Kmeron

Kendrick Lamar, Florence + The Machine and Stevie Wonder will headline the inaugural year of Denver’s Grandoozy music festival.

The event kicks off September 14-16 at Overland Park Golf Course. It is expected to draw 30 to 40,000 people daily.

Tickets go on sale beginning at 10 a.m. March 23, 2018 at Grandoozy.com. Pricing starts at $224.50 for general admission three-day tickets and $599.50 for VIP three-day tickets. There will be a layaway plan to allow ticket buyers the option to split the cost of purchase into multiple payments over time.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

You may know Chris Daniels best as the energetic frontman for blues band Chris Daniels & The Kings, but lately it’s other people’s music that’s been on his mind.

Daniels is the new executive director of the Colorado Music Hall of Fame.

Jay Goldman/Creative Commons

In the concert industry, Colorado has long been considered a “flyover state,” but Denver still ranks in the top 10 for the amount of live music.

Courtesy of Backstage Theatre

As actors Charlie Schmidt and Cory Wendling would make their way from Denver to Breckenridge, they would joke about one of their favorite nostalgia films, “Hot Dog: The Movie,” and what that would look like on the stage.

Eventually though, they stopped joking.

“Three years later, it’s a full, two-hour musical,” Schmidt said.

Joan Marcus/Courtesy of DCPA

When general admission seats for “Hamilton” go on sale Jan. 22 at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, a lot of fans will be online taking their shot at tickets. Unfortunately, they won’t be the only ones.

With such a high-demand show, third-party ticket brokers will also eagerly be looking for ways to get their hands on tickets. Lots of tickets. The brokers use online bots to purchase large blocks of tickets and then resell them, often on websites designed to look like they are affiliated with the venue, said John Ekeberg, executive director of DCPA’s Broadway division.

The first tip-off: an exorbitant price tag.

“If it seems too expensive, there’s a good chance that it is,” Ekeberg said.

Courtesy Meow Wolf

It’s official: Meow Wolf Denver will open in 2020.

At 90,000 square feet, the arts collective’s first permanent exhibition outside of its Santa Fe home will be more than three times the size of the original space. Inside, it will continue the group’s style of “maximalist storytelling” through bright and bold installations from local artists.

Courtesy of Red Rocks Amphitheatre

Red Rocks Amphitheater is instituting new ticketing and seating procedures to improve access for fans with disabilities and to reduce ticket fraud.

Beginning with the 2018 concert season, seats in the first four rows -- including the handicapped-accessible section -- must be used by the ticket purchaser. Officials say those seats are the most likely to be purchased by ticket bots and then resold at higher prices on the secondary market.

Luke Runyon / KUNC

Update 10-23-17: The Colorado Attorney General's Office has filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit brought by Deep Green Resistance on behalf of the Colorado River ecosystem. The story has been updated to reflect this development.

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A few months ago Denver civil rights lawyer Jason Flores-Williams had an idea. He’s made a name for himself recently in a class action lawsuit against the city of Denver where he’s representing the city’s homeless people.

“A lot of times I meet with class members, I take them out to dinner because they’re starving,” he said.

While at a Denver Mexican restaurant, the group started talking about homelessness. One of his homeless clients piped up.

“In an off the cuff, offhand comment [he] said, ‘the only thing more homeless than the homeless is nature,’” Flores-Williams recalled.

Courtesy of Argent Studio

You may not know the name Lawrence Argent, but you likely know his work.

The Colorado sculptor was behind Denver’s big blue bear. The 60-year-old died unexpectedly on Wednesday.

Titled “I See What You Mean,” Argent’s 40-foot-tall bear peeking into the Colorado Convention Center has been an iconic public artwork since it was installed in 2005. Larger-than-life animals were one of his hallmarks. The artist also created a 20-foot-tall rabbit in the middle of the Sacramento International Airport and a 49-foot-tall panda hanging from a building in China.

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