K-12 Education

2:31pm

Fri May 30, 2014
NPR Ed

Standardized Testing: The Onion Nails It

Are tests biased against students who just don't care? The Onion weighs in.
Chad McDermott iStockphoto.com

Standardized tests. A lot of parents hate them because they think they're too stressful, that their kids take too many, and that a bad test could ruin hopes of Harvard.

Some teachers are dubious because they're often judged, in part, on how well kids do on these tests.

As for the kids... they hate 'em, too. But kids in the U.S. hate standardized tests for very different reasons than, say, kids in the U.K. or Japan or Finland.

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1:21pm

Tue May 27, 2014
NPR Ed

A Dress Code Double Standard? #YesAllWomen Answers 'Yes'

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 1:49 pm

The Santa Barbara shootings this weekend and the online rants of the 22-year-old identified as the gunman brought an outpouring of reaction online over the weekend.

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6:03am

Mon May 26, 2014
NPR Ed

Your Thoughts On The Most Important Challenge Facing Education

Originally published on Mon May 26, 2014 12:47 pm

Many call for revisions in education.
Nic McPhee Flickr

For our first blog post last week, we asked about the biggest opportunities and challenges in education today and repeated the call on Twitter. Here's what you said. You can also read this story on Storify.

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8:03am

Sat May 24, 2014
NPR Ed

Why Mr. Rogers Is Having A Big Moment In Education

Originally published on Sat May 24, 2014 10:18 am

Digital media? Creativity? Early Childhood education? Mr. Rogers was an early champion for trends that are hot in education today.
AP

"Would you be mine? Could you be mine? Won't you be my neighbor?"

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6:03am

Thu May 22, 2014
NPR Ed

'Mischievous Responders' Confound Research On Teens

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 11:30 am

Not all kids lie on research surveys. But enough teenagers make up answers that it can significantly skew the results.
iStockphoto

Teenagers face some serious issues: drugs, bullying, sexual violence, depression, gangs. They don't always like to talk about these things with adults.

One way that researchers and educators can get around that is to give teens a survey — a simple, anonymous questionnaire they can fill out by themselves without any grown-ups hovering over them. Hundreds of thousands of students take such surveys every year. School districts use them to gather data; so do the federal government, states and independent researchers.

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