K-12 Education

1:29am

Tue June 3, 2014
NPR Ed

The Common Core Curriculum Void

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 7:29 am

Just some of the more than 700 math books that have been reviewed for Common Core alignment by professor William Schmidt and his team at Michigan State's Center for the Study of Curriculum.
Cory Turner NPR

Right now, America's schools are in a sprint. Forty-four states and the District of Columbia have adopted the Common Core State Standards. That means new learning benchmarks for the vast majority of the nation's young students — millions of kids from kindergarten through high school. And, for many of them, the Core Standards will feel tougher than what they're used to. Because they are tougher.

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1:03pm

Mon June 2, 2014
NPR Ed

Reaching Immigrant Children By Helping Their Parents

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 3:00 pm

There are 96 languages spoken across the Los Angeles Unified School District; 49 percent of California's young children have an immigrant parent.
Julie Flickr

At our neighborhood playground in Brooklyn, you can hear kids shouting and playing in Russian, Spanish, Yiddish, Tagalog, French, Hebrew, Vietnamese, Cantonese and Polish. This kind of giddy cacophony has been par for the course in New York City for 150 years, but it's becoming more and more common across the country.

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7:33am

Sun June 1, 2014
NPR Ed

In Kentucky, Moving Beyond Dependence On Tests

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 5:36 pm

A school in Danville, Ky., has become a national exemplar.
Anya Kamenetz NPR

The white, split-rail fences of horse farms line the two-lane road that takes you southwest from Lexington. It's a beautiful half-hour drive to Danville, Ky.

Settled in 1783, the town is proud of its history. In Constitution Square, across Main Street from Burke's Bakery, sits a tiny log cabin that was once the first post office west of the Allegheny Mountains.

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4:03pm

Fri May 30, 2014
NPR Ed

Is The Deck Stacked Against Black Boys In America?

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 5:27 pm

President Obama, with Attorney General Eric Holder and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan, speaks about a report from My Brother's Keeper, an initiative to expand opportunities for young men and boys of color.
Susan Walsh AP

The numbers are grim. Black boys are more likely than white boys to live in poverty, and with a single parent. They're also more likely to be suspended from school and land in prison, and less likely to be able to read.

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2:31pm

Fri May 30, 2014
NPR Ed

Standardized Testing: The Onion Nails It

Are tests biased against students who just don't care? The Onion weighs in.
Chad McDermott iStockphoto.com

Standardized tests. A lot of parents hate them because they think they're too stressful, that their kids take too many, and that a bad test could ruin hopes of Harvard.

Some teachers are dubious because they're often judged, in part, on how well kids do on these tests.

As for the kids... they hate 'em, too. But kids in the U.S. hate standardized tests for very different reasons than, say, kids in the U.K. or Japan or Finland.

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