Science

3:02pm

Wed June 13, 2012
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Airborne Launch Sends X-Ray Observatory Into Earth Orbit

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 7:30 pm

This artist's illustration shows what NuSTAR should look like in orbit after its 30-foot-long mast deployed.
JPL-Caltech NASA

A NASA mission aimed at surveying black holes and supernovae, among other things, launched successfully today at noon ET from beneath the belly of a wide-body jet flying approximately 40,000 feet above a darkened Pacific Ocean.

The 772-pound NuSTAR X-ray observatory was carried into an equatorial orbit about 400 miles above the Earth by a Pegasus rocket, which fired its three-stage motor for 13 minutes after being dropped by the L-1011 jet.

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11:33am

Wed June 13, 2012
The Two-Way

New Research: U.S. Is Warming, But Not Uniformly

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 3:09 pm

In red, are the states that have seen the highest temperature change.
Climate Central

New analysis (pdf) of climate data finds that since 1912, the United States has warmed 1.3 degrees. But that warming is concentrated in certain states, some of which have "warmed 60 times faster than the 10 slowest-warming states."

All of that is according to Climate Central, a research and journalism non-profit that seeks to inform the public about climate and energy. The center looked at data from the National Climatic Data Center's U.S. Historical Climatology Network.

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3:32am

Tue June 12, 2012
Science

Summer Science: The Perfectly Toasted Marshmallow

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 6:18 am

Joe Palca's perfectly toasted marshmallow.
Maggie Starbard NPR

It's the epic quest of campers everywhere: How do you get the perfectly toasted marshmallow? In our inaugural installment of NPR's Summer Science series, we gave some guidance on the first key ingredient: how to build the campfire. (Later this summer, we'll attempt to answer the vexing question of how to stave off brain freeze.)

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4:11pm

Mon June 11, 2012
The Two-Way

Scientists Back Off, Neutrinos Were Not Clocked At Speeds Faster Than Light

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 5:11 am

A 2009 London art installation, Super K Sonic Booum, by Nelly Ben Hayoun replicated a neutrino detector, allowing the public to ride in a boat accompanied by the physicists working on the Super-Kamiokande in Japan.
Nick Ballon

We're a few days late on this news, but because we've focused on neutrinos that may have moved faster than the speed of light before, we thought it only fair to bring you the news:

The team of Italian scientists running an experiment called OPERA, who said they had clocked neutrinos moving faster than light, have come to terms with their findings: Their experiment does not challenge a very basic tenant of physics.

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4:02am

Sun June 10, 2012
Space

NASA Fishes For Tools To Tackle Asteroid

Originally published on Sun June 10, 2012 6:32 pm

Astronauts Shannon Walker and David Saint-Jacques test a probe in the waters off Key Largo, Fla. Their research may help NASA set foot on an asteroid someday.
Miami Herald MCT via Getty Images

NASA may have retired its shuttles, but it has its sights on sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before.

These voyages are years away, but on Monday, astronauts are heading underwater to take part in a simulation that will help them figure out how they might explore one possible new destination: a near-Earth asteroid.

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