Science

11:20am

Wed January 25, 2012
The Two-Way

'Blue Marble 2012': NASA's 'Most Amazing' High Def Image Of Earth So Far

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 3:41 pm

"Blue Marble 2012." Want to see a really big version of this photo? Click here.
NASA

The "Blue Marble" image of Earth snapped by the crew of Apollo 17 in 1972 is one of the most famous photos ever taken. When it appeared, we all suddenly saw the world in a much different way.

In the years since, NASA has added other "Blue Marble" photos to its collection, and has used technology to enhance and sharpen the images.

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1:47pm

Tue January 24, 2012
The Two-Way

Massive Solar Storm Causes Planes To Be Rerouted

Originally published on Tue January 24, 2012 5:13 pm

This January 23, 2012 image provided by NASA, captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, shows an M9-class solar flare erupting on the Sun's northeastern hemisphere.
AFP/Getty Images

You might have heard about a major solar storm that is hitting Earth right now. It's the biggest to hit us since 2005. You've also probably heard a few people say, "I didn't feel anything."

As our friends at 13.7 explained earlier today, the storms have the ability to disrupt sensitive electronics and even the power grid. Usually none of those things happen. But, today's solar storm did cause a bit of disruption.

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9:09am

Mon January 23, 2012
The Salt

Geoengineered Food? Climate Fix Could Boost Crop Yields, But With Risks

Altering the upper atmosphere could block enough sunlight to offset the warming effects of climate change and protect food crops. But what are the risks?
iStockphoto

For a few years now, a handful of scientists have been proposing grandiose technological fixes for the world's climate to combat the effects of global warming — schemes called geoengineering.

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4:51pm

Thu January 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Researchers Say Male Spiders 'Eavesdrop' To Steal Opponents' Dance Moves

A wolf spider watches an opponent dance.
University of Cincinnati

10:01pm

Wed January 4, 2012
Science

How Fracking Wastewater Is Tied To Quakes

Originally published on Thu January 5, 2012 1:00 pm

With the skyline of Youngstown, Ohio, in the distance, a brine injection well owned by Northstar Disposal Services LLC is seen in Youngstown on Jan. 4. The company has halted operations at the well, which disposes of brine used in gas and oil drilling, after a series of small earthquakes hit the Youngstown area.
Amy Sancetta AP

Small earthquakes in Ohio and Arkansas associated with hydraulic fracturing for natural gas have taken many people by surprise. Gas industry executives say there's no hard evidence that their activities are causing these quakes. But some scientists say it's certainly possible; in fact, people have been causing quakes for years.

In the 1960s, geologists realized that gold mines in South Africa had created small earthquakes. Caverns dug into the earth thousands of feet below the surface collapsed. The "pancake" effect caused quakes — in one case a magnitude-5.2 temblor.

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