Science

9:18am

Tue October 1, 2013
Science

What's The Forecast On Kepler-7B? Hot And Cloudy

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 10:34 am

An artist's rendition of Kepler-7b (left) with Jupiter for comparison.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/MIT

Scientists are reasonably sure that it's a cloudy day on Kepler-7b, a planet that orbits its star about 1,000 light-years away from us.

Using NASA's orbiting space telescopes, researchers publishing in Astrophysical Journal Letters say that for the first time they've been able to make a rudimentary map of the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet.

The team used faint visible light and infrared reflections from Kepler-7b to make their cloud map.

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4:59pm

Mon September 30, 2013
Science

Scientists May Have Source For A.D. 1257 'Mystery Eruption'

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 5:08 pm

The Samalas volcanic crater at Rinjani National Park on Lombok Island, Indonesia.
Rinjani National Park, Indonesia

Scientists think they've identified the source of a massive volcanic eruption that occurred in A.D. 1257 and spread telltale traces across the globe.

The culprit in the "mystery eruption" appears to be the Samalas volcano, part of the Mount Rinjani Volcanic Complex on Indonesia's Lombok Island, an international team of scientists publishing in PNAS journal says.

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1:06am

Fri September 27, 2013
Research News

How Recycling Bias Affects What You Toss Where

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 4:07 am

iStockphoto.com

During an experiment, marketing professor Remi Trudel noticed a pattern in what his volunteers were recycling versus throwing in the garbage. He then went through his colleagues' trash and recycling bins at Boston University for more data.

He found the same pattern, says NPR's Shankar Vedantam: "Whole sheets of paper typically went in the recycling, but paper fragments went in the trash."

Same type of paper, different shapes, different bins.

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4:18pm

Thu September 26, 2013
Science

Scientists Find Sea Louse Has Tidal 'Body Clock'

The speckled sea louse.
Wikipedia Commons

One thing you can say about the diminutive speckled sea louse: it's always on time.

Scientists studying the tiny crustacean, a marine cousin of the wood-louse, found that it runs not one, but two internal clocks. Not only does the creature have a circadian rhythm, or so called "body clock" like most land-dwelling animals, including humans, but it also has a circatidal clock that follows the 12.4-hour cycle of the tide.

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3:45pm

Sat September 21, 2013
Science

Black Widow Spider Fan Gets Dangerously Close To His Subject

Originally published on Sat September 21, 2013 6:07 pm

Nature writer Jackson Landers kept a black widow alive in a jar on his desk for months.
Courtesy Jackson Landers

The first time Jackson Landers spotted a black widow spider on his front porch, he was transfixed. The nature writer grew curious about the poisonous arachnids and even kept one as a pet in a jar for months.

"When you're confronted by this deadly, venomous thing day after day, you can't help but become interested in it," Landers tells NPR's Arun Rath.

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