Housing

Studying The Anthropology Of North Dakota's Oil Boom Man Camps

Feb 11, 2015
Andrew Cullen / Inside Energy

"Man camps" are a defining characteristic of an oil boom. Development happens so fast, there's never enough time to build adequate permanent housing - so temporary worker housing takes up the slack. When oil prices come crashing down, the man camps empty out.

Two researchers from the University of North Dakota, Bill Caraher and Bret Webber, said this housing boom-bust cycle is just part of a long history of settlement on the northern Great Plains. As part of their ongoing North Dakota Man Camp Project, they visit dozens of RV parks across the Bakken multiple times a year, interviewing residents and taking note of changes.

Prizmatic / Flickr - Creative Commons

Boulder residents can officially rest easy knowing that they have the most toilets per person of any city in the country. Denver has a place on the porcelain ranking too. That’s according to Redfin, a real estate broker and technology company, who recently mused on their blog on the cities in America with the most toilets per household.

Nathan Heffel / KUNC

Summit County has distinct advantages like sprawling mountain vistas and world class ski resorts, making it a prime vacation spot. But for the county's educated middle class, living there full-time, there are disadvantages to calling the county home.

Making ends meet, and buying a home here, is harder than it looks.

Bradley Gordon / Flickr-Creative Commons

A Colorado Division of Housing 2014 first quarter report [.pdf] found that rents in many Front Range cities hit an all time high, with rents in the Loveland-Fort Collins metropolitan area jumping 17.2 percent from this time last year. Fort Collins average rent hit $1,183, and Denver's average rents are $1,073.

It turns out those high rental rates may also be affecting the local housing market, real estate agents say.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr - Creative Commons

Greeley’s fast growing economy and low unemployment rate does have its downsides. Rent is on the increase in the oil boomtown.

This week, we're exploring the San Francisco Bay Area and the way income inequality is affecting the region. Check out the other pieces of the week, aggregated on this page.

Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

For decades, housing developments in the suburbs have come complete with golf courses, tennis courts, strip malls and swimming pools. But make way for the new subdivision amenity: the specialty farm.

Matt Scott / Creative Commons/Flickr

Finding rental housing in northern Colorado continues to be a challenge, with vacancies near historic lows in the third quarter of 2013.

Around The Nation: Pot, Gambling And GMOs On The Election Ballot

Oct 4, 2013
No on Proposition AA / Facebook

In Colorado, voters will consider a huge tax hike on newly legal marijuana. New Yorkers could expand gambling. And Washington voters are in the midst of a multimillion-dollar campaign over the labeling of genetically modified foods.

Led by more strong gains in Las Vegas, San Francisco, San Diego and Los Angeles, home prices in major U.S. cities were up just more than 12 percent on average in July vs. July 2012, according to the latest S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices report.

The average increase was the largest since February 2006, Reuters adds, and is yet another sign that the housing sector is among the economy's strongest sectors.

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