Colorado Arts

Courtesy of Bas Bleu Theatre

The song “Somewhere That’s Green” from the musical “Little Shop of Horrors” is one of Fort Collins actor Jonathan Farwell’s favorites. It was a standard part of his wife, Deb Note-Farwell's, repertoire whenever she was invited to sing.

“And every time I heard it, I cried,” Jonathan said. “So that’s really what happens to me now. I don’t know if worse is the word or maybe better -- to feel what it feels like to miss her that much.”

Ashley Jefcoat / KUNC

This summer, real estate agents James Carlson and Erin Spradlin have been taking tourists around the streets of Denver. But it’s not hot properties they’re taking them to see.

The husband-and-wife team recently started the Denver Graffiti Tour, showcasing some of the biggest murals and best street artists in the city, after taking a similar tour in Bogota, Columbia.

“We got to meet locals in a way that we wouldn’t normally have,” Spradlin said. “We got to see a neighborhood we otherwise wouldn’t have. And we got to hear about the history and the politics of that neighborhood through some amazing art.”

Photo by Patrick Houdek

For more than a decade, a typical “work day” for Anthony Kovacs meant spending time on stage with loud guitars and drums, singing into a microphone as the lead vocalist for the Chicago punk band Shot Baker.

Even when he wasn’t on stage, Kovacs said his daily life was pretty noisy.

“When I wasn’t on tour I was working in music venues as a door guy or whatever I was doing, so I was exposed to loud quite a bit,” he said. “And at some point, I noticed that my hearing wasn’t as sharp as it once was, and it actually started scaring me into wearing hearing protection.”

Stacy Nick / KUNC

For 30 years, Annie Hamilton has handled casting for many of the television and film projects made in Colorado -- including, most recently, the Jane Fonda/Robert Redford Netflix film, “Our Souls at Night.”

Recently, Hamilton helped conduct an open-casting call for a brand of actor that is becoming more and more sought after in Colorado: “real people.”

“We’re steering away from the beauty and skinny,” she said. “They want real because that’s who the consumers are. That’s who their audience is.”

Courtesy of Denver Fire Department

For the second time in a week, parts of Denver’s Civic Center Park have been damaged.

Over the weekend, a hit-and-run driver took out part of the park’s more than 100-year-old marble balustrade. Wednesday, the interactive installation “Tree of Transformation” was set on fire. The sculpture, which features an antique piano with a steel tree growing out of it, was a total loss.

“The edge of the park in particular has taken a bit of a beating lately,” said Scott Robson, executive director of the Civic Center Conservancy. Especially the part of the park along Colfax Avenue, which Robson described as a bit of a “war zone.”

Stacy Nick / KUNC

When Art Comes to Town: This story is the second in a series as KUNC arts and culture reporter Stacy Nick explores the impact art has on Colorado communities — and the impact those communities have on the art that comes out of them.

Sun Valley is one of Denver’s poorest neighborhoods. More than 80 percent of households live below the poverty line and 70 percent of residents are unemployed. It also has the highest violent-crime rate, more than five times the citywide average.

But between a public-housing initiative, a proposed mixed‐use neighborhood near the home of the Denver Broncos and several arts destinations moving into the area, Sun Valley is set to see more than a billion dollars in investments in the next five years.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

It’s hard to imagine a Fourth of July celebration without certain things — cookouts, fireworks, the American flag and the singing of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” But for many, Francis Scott Key’s iconic song can sound a little sour.

Colorado Photographic Arts Center / From the Hip Photo

Colorado Photographic Arts Center executive director Samantha Johnston says their mission is all about art.

"We are supporting the arts, the photographic arts specifically, through education, exhibitions, and community outreach," says Johnston.

The center, founded in 1963, serves as a dedicated photography space in Denver.

Courtesy of NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Bet you never thought about Mozart and methane going together, did you? One music festival is doing just that: combining classical music and climate science.

It might seem a little strange to some, but that’s kind of the idea, said Jephta Bernstein, executive artistic director for Off the Hook Arts. The Fort Collins music education program is using the theme Mission Earth for its SummerFest 2018 series.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

Since 1909, Greeley Hat Works, or The Shining Parlor as it was named back then, has been making hats.

“I’m the fourth hatmaker to own it, and I’ve been doing this about 25 years,” said owner Trent Johnson.

And while hat styles may have changed a lot over the last 109 years, the equipment used to make them really hasn't.

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