Food & Food Culture

1:38pm

Fri February 8, 2013
The Salt

When The Microbes Are Happy, The Brewer Is Happy

Yeast affects several aspects of beer including the foam, or head, that forms on the of the glass. If fermentation is too vigorous, too many of the foam-stabilizing proteins may be lost.
Cate Gillon Getty Images

Yeast can be pretty demanding little buggers, despite being unicellular microscopic organisms. Brewers know they must appease them to get the beer they want.

"It's yeast-strain dependent, it's environment, it's temperature, oxygen levels," says Matt Brophy, brewmaster of Flying Dog Brewery in Frederick, Md. "There's a lot of variables that you need to have a high level of control over."

Read more

7:43am

Fri February 8, 2013
The Salt

Chinese New Year: Dumplings, Rice Cakes And Long Life

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 2:37 pm

Year cakes made of sticky rice are among the traditional Chinese New Year foods.
Ju-x Flickr.com

About 3,000 years ago, give or take a couple of decades, the Chinese people began celebrating the beginning of their calendar year with a joyful festival they called Lunar New Year. They cleaned their homes, welcomed relatives, bought or made new clothes and set off firecrackers. And there was feasting and special offerings made to the Kitchen God for about two weeks.

Read more

4:07pm

Thu February 7, 2013
The Salt

Fried Chicken And Sweet Tea: Recipe For A Stroke

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:04 pm

Delicious, yes. But it's really not health food.
Todd Patterson iStockphoto.com

Fried chicken washed down with sweet tea — it's a classic Southern lunch. That fat/sweet nexus is also a recipe for a stroke, according to a recent study.

Researchers at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, have been trying to nail down how diet relates to stroke, particularly in the "Stroke Belt" — the Southeastern states that have the dubious distinction of hosting the nation's highest stroke rates.

Read more

3:01pm

Thu February 7, 2013
The Salt

Animal Magnetism: How Salmon Find Their Way Back Home

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 12:50 pm

Bright red sockeye salmon swim up the Fraser River to the stream where they were hatched.
Current Biology, Putman et al.

Before they end up filleted and sautéed on your dinner plate, salmon lead some pretty extraordinary, globe-trotting lives.

After hatching in a freshwater stream, young salmon make a break for the ocean, where they hang out for years, covering thousands of miles before deciding its time to settle down and lay eggs in their natal stream.

So how do these fish find their way back to their home river?

Read more

10:09am

Thu February 7, 2013
The Salt

Chain Restaurants Boost Sales With Lower-Calorie Foods

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 12:54 pm

Ordering the small fries? You're part of a trend.
iStockphoto.com

Lower-calorie foods are driving growth and profits for chain restaurants, according to fresh research, suggesting that people are making smarter choices when it comes to burgers and fries.

We're still ordering the burger and fries, mind you. But we're going for smaller portions and shunning sugary drinks. French fry sales dropped about 2 percent from 2006 to 2011, while sales of lower-calorie beverages rose 10 percent, the study found.

Read more

Pages