Food & Food Culture

2:09pm

Tue November 26, 2013
The Salt

In Vermont, A Wild-Game Church Supper Feeds The Multitudes

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 6:32 pm

Adventurous carnivores from all over New England have been flocking to the Wild Game Supper in Bradford, Vt., for almost 60 years. The fare at this year's event included beaver, boar, moose and buffalo.
Herb Swanson for NPR

The wild-game supper has traditionally been a way for rural America to share the harvest before winter sets in. Food historians trace the ritual back to Colonial times, when families had to hunt in order to eat well, and some providers were better shots than others.

Read more

11:34am

Tue November 26, 2013
The Salt

Beer-Tapping Physics: Why A Hit To A Bottle Makes A Foam Volcano

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 10:37 am

Morgan Walker NPR

Ah, the old beer-tapping prank: One strong hit on the top of an open beer bottle, and poof! Your IPA explodes into a brewski volcano.

"In one second, most of your beer has really turned into foam," says physicist Javier Rodriguez Rodriguez of Carlos III University in Madrid. "You better have put the bottle into your mouth, because you need to drink whatever is coming out."

Read more

9:50am

Fri November 22, 2013
Agriculture

Why The ‘Turkey Shortage’ Won't Affect Your Thanksgiving Dinner

No need to panic, there's still plenty of turkey to be had. The "shortage" was only from one company, Butterball, and affected large, fresh birds.
Credit Martin Pettitt / Flickr - Creative Commons

5:00am

Mon November 18, 2013
Business

Proposed Merger Could Create Wheat Milling Goliath

By the time these hard red winter wheat sprouts reach maturity, it's likely the market for wheat will look very different with a looming merger of some of the biggest players in flour milling.
Credit Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

Fall is planting time for wheat across the Great Plains. This year’s crop went into the ground while big changes were underway in the wheat market. Some of the biggest players in the flour milling industry are joining forces to make the country’s largest miller even larger.

Read more

1:01am

Fri November 15, 2013
The Salt

Philippines Disaster Rekindles Fight Over Food Aid Rules

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:49 am

A relief worker looks over boxes of aid provided by the U.S. on November 14, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. Proponents of food aid reform say it makes more sense for the U.S. to buy food donations locally than ship them across the globe.
Chris McGrath Getty Images

Emergency aid, including stocks of food, started arriving this week in cyclone-devastated areas of the Philippines; more is on the way.

The first wave of aid — high-energy biscuits designed to keep people alive when food is scarce — arrived via airlift. Huge shiploads of rice will be needed in the weeks and months to come. And exactly how the U.S. donates of that rice is a flashpoint in a long-running debate in Washington, D.C., about food aid.

Read more

Pages