Race Ethnicity & Culture

5:44am

Wed April 30, 2014
Sweetness And Light

Bad Behavior From A Sports Franchise Owner? That's Not New

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 7:13 am

Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling at a game against the San Antonio Spurs on Nov. 7, 2012, in Los Angeles.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling has been banned for life from the NBA after he made racist comments.

Sports bans aren't new.

In 1990, New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner was banned from day-to-day management of the club by Major League Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent.

Steinbrenner was reinstated in 1993.

Sterling is 80. He comes from another time and is not only the senior NBA owner –– since 1981 –– but also, although probably this won't surprise you, historically the very worst owner in all of sport.

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9:10am

Fri April 18, 2014
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays

Six Words: 'Segregation Should Not Determine Our Future'

The student population at D'Leisha Dent's high school, Central High in Tuscaloosa, Ala., is almost entirely African-American. Dent says she and her peers wish they had more opportunities to interact with white students.
Maisie Crow

The investigative journalism group ProPublica, with reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones, has just completed a yearlong project, Segregation Now, exploring the re-segregation of schools in the U.S., with a particular look at Tuscaloosa, Ala.

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6:49am

Sun April 6, 2014
Code Switch

Stereotypes Of Appalachia Obscure A Diverse Picture

Originally published on

Frank Cedillo fishes in a Greenville, Tenn., lake.
Courtesy of Megan King

Children in sepia-toned clothes with dirt-smeared faces. Weathered, sunken-eyed women on trailer steps chain-smoking Camels. Teenagers clad in Carhartt and Mossy Oak loitering outside of long-shuttered businesses.

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6:22am

Fri April 4, 2014
Code Switch

Sit Next To Rosa Parks At The National Civil Rights Museum

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:13 am

The Montgomery Bus Boycott exhibit at the National Civil Rights Museum features a vintage city bus. Visitors can go inside the bus and sit next to a figure of Rosa Parks.
Christopher Blank WKNO

In 1991, the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., became America's first major museum to paint a broad picture of the civil rights movement. Its content hasn't changed much since then. But this Saturday after a nearly $28 million renovation that took 18 months, the museum will reopen with a new design that aims to appeal to an older generation as well as a post-civil-rights-era audience.

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5:58pm

Tue April 1, 2014
Code Switch

The Harlem Hellfighters: Fighting Racism In The Trenches Of WWI

The Harlem Hellfighters, a new graphic novel by Max Brooks, retells the story of the first African-American unit to fight in World War I.
Caanan White Courtesy of Broadway Books

The 369th Infantry Regiment served 191 days under enemy fire in Europe. They returned home one of the most decorated American units of World War I.

"The French called them the 'Men of Bronze' out of respect, and the Germans called them the 'Harlem Hellfighters' out of fear," explains Max Brooks, author of The Harlem Hellfighters, a new graphic novel about the first African-American infantry unit to fight in World War I.

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