Without Federal Regulations, States Are On Their Own To Enforce Safety In Marijuana Industry

For every crop in the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency carries out a rigorous set of tests to determine which pesticides are safest. How and when a pesticide is used can depend on how that crop is consumed by the average person — is it ingested, inhaled or applied topically? It’s a precise science that aims to keep consumers safe from potentially toxic residues. But, like most federal regulations, none of it applies to the marijuana industry.

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When the Irish government decided in 2008 to bail out the nation's banks, the country started down the slope to fiscal ruin.

But the decision also had a much broader effect: It wound up inspiring bank bailouts throughout Europe and the U.S.

Ireland was the first country to bail out its banks during the 2008 crisis. The move prompted investors to begin moving their money out of other European banks and into Irish banks.

A treatment that's being billed as a big breakthrough in AIDS is prompting a very uncomfortable question: How much are we willing to pay to prevent people from becoming infected with HIV?

Scientists at San Francisco's Gladstone Institutes announced that gay men and some transgendered women who took a daily pill called Truvada were 73 percent less likely to become infected with the virus. The study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine today.

Part of a series on the U.S. Postal Service

Time was when you'd take out your favorite pen to write a heartfelt note in a Christmas card and then put a stamp on it. But for more than a decade, people have been using the Internet to send holiday greetings as well as birthday cards and party invitations.

Though my cold, black heart rarely stirs for the work of singer-songwriters, the voice of Sharon Van Etten always turns me into a weepy, vulnerable heap. If you listen closely to this gorgeous Tiny Desk performance she gave with her musical partner, Cat Martino, you can hear the sound of my eyelashes fluttering with misty delight.

Los Lobos has proven time and again that a universal shared experience will always trump culture and language. The group writes music that speaks to all of us as individuals, yet can make us feel connected when we pack ourselves into a club to watch them perform.

Few musicians get better with age, but Nick Lowe is an exception. I've been following Lowe's music since his days with the country-rock band Brinsley Schwarz in the early 1970s. He wrote one of his best-known tunes with that band: "(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding?" But it wasn't until he left Brinsley Schwarz that people began hearing his name, first with the Dave Edmunds project Rockpile. (Edmunds produced one of the last Brinsley Schwarz records, the one with "What's So Funny.")

First it's the GPS router of doom, now the robots are just going to be driving the cars?

The New York Times had a piece over the weekend that outlined yet another Google-cum-robot plan for world domination. Robot cars. No, really, I'm serious.

I cheat on books regularly. Were I to write my confessions, I would have to admit to buying books for purely aesthetic reasons. Some I bought for their covers, some for the feel of the paper, and some I had a genuine interest in -- until a newer, glossier novel caught my eye. My first encounter with Gayle Forman's If I Stay began like most of my romances -- for purely physical reasons. But something told me this book was "the one." And sometimes you just can't let a special book go.

The sad story of the whooping cough epidemic that's hit California this year keeps getting sadder.

The state health department now says there have been nine death — all babies.
All the infants were 2 months old or younger when they got sick. Eight were Hispanic.

Overall, more than 4,000 cases of whooping cough, or pertussis, have been reported this year. That's the most since nearly 5,000 cases were reported in 1955, and the year is far from over.

Mavis Staples is a legend, but she's not stuck in the past. You probably know her work with her family band, The Staple Singers, which was all over the radio in the '70s with hits like "Respect Yourself," "Let's Do It Again" and "I'll Take You There" (which she excerpts in her performance here).

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Colorado Edition

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Science Friday LIVE in Boulder

KUNC is bringing Ira Flatow and the Science Friday crew to the Chautauqua Auditorium on June 15 for a live show. Tickets available now!