John Hickenlooper

Courtesy of Gov. John Hickenlooper / colorado.gov

Gov. John Hickenlooper is calling for the resignation of Rep. Steve Lebsock following allegations he sexually harassed 11 people, including three who are publicly named, one of them a fellow lawmaker. 

"Now that the facts are apparent, he should certainly resign," said Hickenlooper.

Martin Falbisoner / Wikimedia Commons

Congress is out for its August recess, yet Colorado’s delegation is staying busy. Here’s KUNC’s roundup of what your senators and representatives have been up to.

State of Colorado / colorado.gov

Colorado has two elected voices to turn to when it comes to the proposed Republican health care bill: Sens. Michael Bennet and Cory Gardner.

Bennet is a Democrat and has made clear his stance on the bill, calling it “fundamentally flawed.”

Sandra Fish / KUNC

The 2018 contest for Colorado governor is shaping up to be a battle of the big bucks.

One wealthy Republican already put $3 million into his campaign. Democratic Congressman Jared Polis, who entered the race mid-June, has spent $10 million on his campaigns since 2000.

But money doesn’t always buy political victory.

Bente Birkeland / Capitol Coverage

Colorado is ramping up efforts to try and prevent marijuana from being diverted to the black market. Gov. John Hickenlooper signed two bi-partisan bills into law Thursday. "I think we’re protecting neighborhoods from the violence often associated with organized crime," said Hickenlooper. "We’re no longer the Wild West. I don’t think it’s good for Colorado to have the loosest laws."

Mexican-American artist Ana Teresa Fernández. The ocean and sky play significant roles in her work exploring the boundaries between Mexico and America.
Travis Jensen / Courtesy of the artist

Platform Americas explores the artistic, cultural, business, and political connections — and disconnections — between the Americas.

In Episode 1, Mexican-American artist Ana Teresa Fernández talks about borders, gender, identity, and her superwoman outfit (note: stiletto heels). Colombian Amb. Juan Carlos Pinzón is on a mission to tell a new story about his country, and Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper talks trade and reawakens his entrepreneurial roots on a visit to Cuba.

Luke Runyon / KUNC

Neighborly disputes are nothing new. There’s the dog next door that poops on your lawn. The house that throws loud backyard parties. The guy down the block who always plows through the stop sign.

But in Colorado, the introduction of legal, home-grown marijuana has elevated tension among neighbors to a whole new level.

Because of gaps in the state constitutional amendments that legalized cultivation of the drug for recreational and medical purposes -- and in the ensuing rules that sought to regulate it further -- some rural pockets in Colorado are seeing large-scale cooperative marijuana grow operations sprout up with little oversight.

KUNC File Photo

With its moratorium on new drilling permits set to expire in a few weeks, Boulder County commissioners unanimously passed new oil and gas regulations. The county calls them the “most restrictive” of such regulations in Colorado. They are about 60 pages and require a much higher environmental and public health standard than the state. Boulder County began the new rule process following two state Supreme Court decisions in 2016 that invalidated hydraulic fracturing bans or long term moratoriums.

Courtesy Visit Salt Lake

Colorado’s top elected officials are attempting to woo the country’s largest gathering of outdoor retailers.

Outdoor Retailer, organized and run by Emerald Expositions, has called Salt Lake City home for 20 years. But a recent dust-up over public land conservation in Utah pitted some influential outdoor brands against the state’s Republican lawmakers, putting the honor of host city up for grabs.

Why Cities Can't Ban Oil And Gas Drilling In Colorado

Feb 24, 2017
Stephanie Paige Ogburn / KUNC

The conflict over oil and gas drilling -- as well as hydraulic fracturing -- has led to multiple protests, votes and court decisions in Colorado. Most recently, Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman began proceedings to sue Boulder County over its lack of new drilling permits.

But the history of oil and gas development and regulation in Colorado is a long one. Here’s how we got to where we are today.

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