Books

1:08am

Tue May 21, 2013
Author Interviews

Courtside Chemistry: How NBA's Phil Jackson Won 'Eleven Rings'

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 9:13 am

Phil Jackson is famous not only for coaching stars — Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen with the Chicago Bulls, Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O'Neal with the L.A. Lakers — but also for his distinctive "zen" approach to basketball. He introduced his teams to yoga and meditation, and regularly assigned his players books to read.

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5:22am

Mon May 20, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: J.K. Rowling Tells 'Harry Potter' Backstories

J.K. Rowling.
Ben Pruchnie Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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4:18pm

Sun May 19, 2013
Author Interviews

Decades Later And Across An Ocean, A Novel Gets Its Due

Sometimes you need some distance to appreciate a classic.

That was certainly the case for John Williams' novel Stoner. When it was originally published in 1965, the only publication to mention the book at all was The New Yorker, in its "Briefly Noted" column. The novel received admiring reviews over the years, but sold just 2,000 copies and was almost immediately forgotten.

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2:09pm

Sun May 19, 2013
Author Interviews

Unacceptable Anger From 'The Woman Upstairs'

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 4:18 pm

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The main character of Claire Messud's novel, The Woman Upstairs, is a good woman. Nora is a 37-year-old elementary school teacher — responsible, kind and reliable. She is also very, very angry.

Her dreams of being an artist have been suppressed; she is seething inside with rage and resentment. But she keeps her anger in until she meets another woman who has everything she does not: a husband, a child and a successful art career. And then everything begins to unravel. As Nora's relationship with the woman and her family deepens, her inner life begins to come out.

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2:41pm

Sat May 18, 2013
The Two-Way

'Waiting To Be Heard' No More, Amanda Knox Speaks Out

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 5:47 pm

Amanda Knox enters an Italian court on Oct. 3, 2011, just before being acquitted of murdering her British roommate, Meredith Kercher.
Oli Scarff AP

When 20-year-old Amanda Knox left for Italy in August 2007, it was supposed to be a carefree year studying abroad.

No one could have foreseen it ending in her being accused, tried and convicted in the murder of her roommate, Meredith Kercher.

The case, and Knox, became an international media sensation.

"I think that there was a lot of fantasy projected onto me," she tells weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden. "And that resulted in a re-appropriation and re-characterization of who I am."

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