Technology

Updated at 1:26 p.m. ET Friday

If Jeff Bezos can't keep his phone safe, how can the rest of us hope to?

Sure, Bezos, Amazon's CEO and the owner of The Washington Post, is smart and presumably has good security people helping him, says Matthew Green, a computer science professor at Johns Hopkins University. But, Green says, "the bad thing about being Jeff Bezos is that there are a lot of people with huge amounts of money who want to hack you."

New research shows that you don’t need a big population to foster innovation.

 


Flying cars, big-screen TVs that rotate vertically to better show your mobile videos, a trash can that changes its own bag: Welcome to CES.

About 200,000 people will descend on Las Vegas this week to check it all out at the annual technology extravaganza of the Consumer Electronics Show.

Among the robots they will encounter is the Charmin RollBot. That's roll as in a roll of toilet paper, which is what the small-wheel robot carries on top of itself.

KUNC has been airing a new show, I’ll Be Seeing You , at 1pm on Sunday afternoons. It’s a 4 part mini series from NPR hosted by Dina Temple-Raston about the Technologies that watch us and KUNC’s Karlie Huckels was able to talk with her about the series. Here are some highlights of that conversation:

Virtual reality is not new. But, as people search for alternative ways to manage pain — and reduce reliance on pills — VR is attracting renewed attention.

Imagine, for a moment you've been transported to a sunlit lagoon. And, suddenly, it's as if you're immersed in the warm water and swimming. That's what Tom Norris experiences when he straps on his VR headset.

The spam calls keep coming, offering you loans or threatening you with jail time for IRS violations. By some estimates, they make up at least a quarter of all calls in the United States.

And as the problem continues to grow, it creates a whole new set of related nuisances for people like Dakota Hill.

He estimates he gets hundreds of unwanted spam calls every month. But Hill says he also gets calls from people who think he's spamming them.

Matt Bloom/KUNC

Bradley Cheetham was about to deliver his fourth or fifth presentation in one month. He’d given so many, he said, he’d nearly lost track.

Pacing back and forth in the hallway outside the Colorado School of Mines classroom, where a crowd of space industry bigwigs awaited him, he shared a few words about life as an entrepreneur.

“Honestly, entrepreneurship is a really hard job,” he said, laughing. “Space is a really hard job. Doing them together does not make either easier.”

Courtesy Virgin Hyperloop One

Imagine getting off your flight at DIA, buckling into a chair inside a pod encased in a vacuum-sealed tube, blasting off at 700 mph and arriving anywhere in northern Colorado under 20 minutes.

That’s the type of mobility promised by new technology dubbed “the hyperloop.”

Joan Marcus/Courtesy of DCPA

When general admission seats for “Hamilton” go on sale Jan. 22 at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, a lot of fans will be online taking their shot at tickets. Unfortunately, they won’t be the only ones.

With such a high-demand show, third-party ticket brokers will also eagerly be looking for ways to get their hands on tickets. Lots of tickets. The brokers use online bots to purchase large blocks of tickets and then resell them, often on websites designed to look like they are affiliated with the venue, said John Ekeberg, executive director of DCPA’s Broadway division.

The first tip-off: an exorbitant price tag.

“If it seems too expensive, there’s a good chance that it is,” Ekeberg said.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

For more than 40 years, George Lundeen has been sculpting bronzes in Loveland. But his process goes back about 500 years -- at least.

“It’s no different than what Michelangelo did,” Lundeen said. “And you can see from his models, he started with very small models, went to a little bit larger model that had more detail on it, and finally went into a piece of stone.”

For Lundeen, it typically starts with a sketch and then a model molded out of clay. That’s used to create a cast for a wax model, which is cast again, and the wax melted out. Then it’s ready for a foundry to make the final piece of art.

But now Lundeen -- and a lot of other sculptors -- are going a bit more high-tech.

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