Science

10:12am

Fri May 4, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Who Killed Men's Hats? Think Of A Three Letter Word Beginning With 'I'

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 8:59 am

Allison Joyce Getty Images

A hundred years ago — and that's when this picture was taken, in 1912 — men didn't leave home without a hat. Boys wore caps. This is a socialist political rally in Union Square in Manhattan. There may be a bare head or two in this crowd, but I think those heads are women's.

Here's another rally, Union Square again. This time it's an Occupy Wall Street demonstration. A hundred years have passed. Same place. Same kind of crowd. But this time: hardly a hat.

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5:06am

Fri May 4, 2012
Space

Photographers, Skywatchers Prepare For Supermoon

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 7:57 am

1:04am

Thu May 3, 2012
Humans

Put Away The Bell Curve: Most Of Us Aren't 'Average'

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 9:06 pm

Hank Aaron breaks Babe Ruth's record for career home runs as he hits No. 715 at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium on April 8, 1974, on his way to a career 755 home runs. Research suggests that in a wide variety of professions, including collegiate and professional sports, a small but significant number of individuals perform exceedingly well and the rest of individuals' performance trails off.
AP

For decades, teachers, managers and parents have assumed that the performance of students and employees fits what's known as the bell curve — in most activities, we expect a few people to be very good, a few people to be very bad and most people to be average.

The bell curve powerfully shapes how we think of human performance: If lots of students or employees happen to show up as extreme outliers — they're either very good or very bad — we assume they must represent a skewed sample, because only a few people in a truly random sample are supposed to be outliers.

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8:58am

Wed May 2, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Fetal Attraction

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 12:10 pm

Steven O'Connor, M.D.

There you are, inside the placenta, all cozy and wrapped; mommy all around you — this is nice.

Except for the occasional leak.

Six years ago I reported on Morning Edition that whenever a woman gets pregnant, some of the baby's cells slip through the placental wall into the mother's blood and settle down for a while — outside the placenta.

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2:30pm

Mon April 30, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Robots Win Battle For Attention At Science Fair

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 2:32 pm

Budding scientists, engineers and doctors lined up to try surgical robots from Intuitive Surgical at a science festival in Washington, D.C., over the weekend.
Scott Hensley NPR

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