Breweries

As America's craft beer industry continues to boom, the waste it generates can pose challenges for sewer systems. But if it's used in the right spot, in the right amount, it's potentially beneficial and can actually save wastewater treatment plants money.

In Bozeman, Mont., the Water Reclamation Facility treats more than 6 million gallons of water every day from sinks, showers, toilets — really anything that goes down a drain. That includes liquid waste from more than 10 breweries in this city of nearly 50,000.

Brewtography Project

When Peter Bouckaert started at New Belgium in the late 1990s, the company was a small, boutique brewery making its way in Fort Collins. He was employee No. 33. During his time there, Bouckaert crafted some of its most beloved brews, including La Folie, French for "the folly."

Now, he and hundreds of other current and former employees face a decision: to sell or not to sell one of the largest independent craft breweries in the country.

Coors brewery
daveynin / CC BY 2.0

Molson Coors Brewing Co. is laying off 500 workers worldwide and restructuring its operations as it faces declining beer sales.

The company expects to save $150 million by closing offices in Denver and elsewhere and simplifying its structure. Its four business units — U.S., Canada, Europe and International — will be consolidated into North America and Europe, with other regions reporting to those two.

Americans are buying less beer from the country's largest breweries, and that has companies looking for new ways to attract customers.

You can see evidence in the beer aisle, where products like spiked seltzers and hemp-infused ales are aimed at the next generation of drinkers.

Now, 175-year-old Pabst Blue Ribbon is trying hard coffee.