Snowpack | KUNC

Snowpack

Wikimedia Commons

Skiing across Colorado’s high country was exceptional in 2014, with some resorts reporting more than 300 inches of snow. All that snow translated to an above-average snowpack.

This winter’s mega snowpack in the mountains is melting and filling reservoirs and rivers around the state. For whitewater rafting companies the big flows are good for thrills. But, some stretches are river are too full to float. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Longtime rafting guide Bob Morse is giving his safety spiel to a small group preparing to board a bright yellow raft. For some, it’s their first time rafting.

Grace Hood / KUNC

Some Greeley residents got a surprise call Sunday night from the Greeley Fire Department giving notice of voluntary evacuations near the Poudre River.

Kent Kanouse / Flickr - Creative Commons

For those of you wishing to venture into the mountains this 2014 Memorial Day weekend you’re in luck. Many mountain roads closed for the winter are now reopening. Some roads remain closed for the foreseeable future and others are temporarily open during daytime hours. Here's a complete list on the current status of the main mountain roads for Colorado’s Northern and Central Mountains.

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

Northern Colorado farmers and municipalities will see a bump from last fall in how much supplemental water they receive from the Colorado-Big Thompson Project, which pulls Western Slope water to the Front Range.

Robert S. Donovan / Creative Commons

Plentiful mountain snowpack means little to no mandatory watering restrictions across Northern Colorado and Denver for the 2014 summer.

National Resources Conservation Service / U.S.D.A

A combination of higher than average snowpack and saturated ground from the September 2013 flood has raised the risk of spring runoff flooding in the Saint Vrain, and Boulder Creek, Big Thompson and the upper Cache La Poudre River drainages.

Colorado Ag Braces For A Post-Flood Irrigation Season

Mar 13, 2014
Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

When September’s flood waters came down the Front Range foothills, it unleashed tremendous pressure on an aging irrigation infrastructure, some of which dated back to the late 1800s. As the weather warms, it’ll be a race to mend the damaged or destroyed ditches before the snow starts to melt.

NRCS

Snowpack levels in most of Colorado are above average for the first time in three years – but that’s not the case across all parts of the state. 

Carrie Saldo

If you medal in the Olympics you could become a household name overnight. Maybe even nab a multi-million dollar endorsement contract. Those trappings aren’t likely for top-ranked competitive snow sculptors.

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