Gardening

9:36am

Tue September 2, 2014
Agriculture

Heirlooms Passed Down By Seed Savers

Steve Carlson handles some seeds of Trail of Tears corn. During the forced march in the 1830s from the southeastern U.S. to Oklahoma and Arkansas, Cherokee planted these seeds along the way.
Credit Sarah Boden for Harvest Public Media

Most vegetable seeds today are bred by seed companies to be hearty and easier to grow. They’re created by cross-breeding different varieties and selecting for specific characteristics.

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6:00am

Sat August 30, 2014
Garden Report

Spring Is The Status Quo, But Fall Planting Is Equally Effective

Most perennials are suited for fall planting.
Credit John / Flickr - Creative Commons

Spring may resemble the time when most gardeners commence planting, but autumn is just as good of a time when it comes to ideal conditions for establishing new plants. Whether to transplant new flora into the soil in fall or spring depends on the characteristics of the plant.

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6:00am

Sat August 23, 2014
Garden Report

How To Diagnose An Ailing Plant

Irregular patterns are an indication of disease rather than environmental factors.
Credit Penn State / Flickr - Creative Commons

When things go wrong with plants there are steps to get to the root of the problem. Systematic sleuthing considers all of the possibilities when identifying the source of the cause behind a sick plant.

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6:00am

Sat August 16, 2014
Garden Report

Got Peaches? 3 Easy Steps To Keep ‘Em Longer

Credit Barbara Samuel / Flickr - Creative Commons

Mmm… Colorado Peaches. Early and mid-season varieties are best eaten fresh. Mid-season varieties ripen in August. They include Sullivan, Blake and Globe. Late ripening varieties include Elberta, Redskin and Hale. They’ll ripen in early September.

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6:00am

Sat August 9, 2014
Garden Report

The Extra Challenges Of Mountain Gardening

Root vegetables can withstand cooler mountain temperatures.
Credit Alyssa Sison / Flickr - Creative Commons

It may come as no surprise that higher elevations place higher demands on plants. The key is figuring out what plants are appropriate for the cooler mountain climate. Cold hardiness is only one variable gardeners have to consider.

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