Books

12:03am

Sat May 4, 2013
Author Interviews

Burt Bacharach: 'Never Be Afraid Of Something That You Can Whistle'

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 8:25 am

Burt Bacharach has just released a memoir, Anyone Who Had a Heart.
Olaf Heine HarperCollins

Burt Bacharach has written huge hit songs, each recognizable after just a couple of notes: "Alfie," "What the World Needs Now," "That's What Friends Are For" — the list goes on. He's written 73 Top 40 hits, along with musical comedies and other collaborations. He's won Oscars and the Gershwin Prize. His songs are often poised on the edge between poignancy and joy, or sometimes the reverse.

Read more

3:07pm

Fri May 3, 2013
Author Interviews

Advice For New Dads From A Veteran Father Of Four

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 6:28 pm

Little, Brown & Company

Clyde Edgerton is the author of 10 novels, but his latest book is nonfiction — a guide for dads. Papadaddy's Book for New Fathers: Advice to Dads of All Ages opens with a summary of Edgerton's own family situation:

I have a daughter, Catherine, aged 30. I have a 9-year-old son, Nathaniel, a 7-year-old son, Ridley, and a 6-year-old daughter, Truma. I'm 68. The age gap between the younger kids and me is not something I think about much, because I feel physically about like I did when I was 40 — or at least, I think I do. I think I ...

Read more

4:52am

Fri May 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Navajo Nation Names Its First Poet Laureate

Luci Tapahonso is the author of several collections of poetry, including A Radiant Curve and Blue Horses Rush In.
Native truth Wikimedia Commons

5:15am

Thu May 2, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Putin Biographer To Write Book On Tsarnaev Brothers

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 8:05 am

This composite photo shows brothers Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, (left) and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19.
AP

1:00am

Thu May 2, 2013
Shots - Health News

Imagine A Flying Pig: How Words Take Shape In The Brain

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 4:20 pm

Although a flying pig doesn't exist in the real world, our brains use what we know about pigs and birds — and superheroes — to create one in our mind's eye when we hear or read those words.
iStockphoto.com

This is a story about a duck. More precisely, it's a story about what your brain just did when you read the word "duck."

Chances are, your brain created an image of a web-footed waterfowl. It also may have recalled the sound of quacking or the feel of feathers. And new research suggests that these mental simulations are essential to understanding language.

Read more

Pages